Week 6 & 7 - Bwindow - research and project start

Par yousra, Liliana, Alex O, Morgan, Amelie, 25/10/15

"The properties of the thing are always very human, at bottom, reassuring for this very reason. They always relate to what is proper to man, to the properties of man: either they respond to man's needs, and that is precisely their use-value, or else they are the product of a human activity that seems to intend them for those needs." -Jacques Derrida, Specters of Marx

    A study on proportion - seemingly easy, yet riddled with contemporary exceptions and a volition to refute standardized sizes to create a unique, yet oddly impersonal form.

Library of study photos

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A general study for each element of the Duality project (table, bed, door, window) is summarized here along with a quick proportional study:

    Table: Physically, the table has a variable, yet standardized surface - desks for example vary in between 120x60[cm] and 120x90[cm]. Height ranges from 70[cm] all the way to 150[cm] (standing desks). A comfortable height to accommodate sitting position is around 75[cm]. The table as an object is very simple, a mere 3 to 4 legs, and a flat surface. However the simplicity of such an object should not be disregarded as the table plays a large role in human work and activity. Use of the table has increased drastically in the past few years with the arrival of personal computers. Now, on top of the usual uses of the table (work, eating, holding things), leisure in the form of internet browsing and/or gaming is included. Of course, such activities can also be done on the bed. Motion-wise, the table is very static. It very rarely moves unless the owner is moving house, or if it's a semi-portable table used for certain events. An interesting development would be to design a truly portable table that would be an "accessory" for an individual. Infrastructure-wise, desks tend to be close to electrical sockets to ensure power for lamps, computers, phones, etc.

    Bed:
Beds share several characteristics with the table in their form: the height is around that of a desk (75[cm]), and the surface is mostly flat. However, the bed takes a form closer to that of man, either standing or lying down. The form of the surface (example: 210[cm]x106.5[cm]) thus shares characteristics with the door, as both have to accommodate a human being in full within said surface. The bed is a piece of furniture used for relaxing: on average it is used for 8 to 10 hours overnight (if you don't study architecture), and can also be used during the day for a quick nap, or just a lie-down. The bed is even more static than the table, as there is no such thing as a portable bed (excluding sleeping bags, and hammocks). A possible infrastructural combination could be between the desk, and the bed, or even the door and the bed.

    Door: As previously stated, the door has a very similar surface to the bed (ex: 210[cm]x94[cm]) but the depth of the door is far smaller than that of any other element (excluding the window) - a mere 9[cm] (average). A door is a passage from one area to another. It can either allow passage or close off the passage (open door/closed door). The differences in the areas can be public/private, private/private, public/public. The time used on average for a door is very minimal, passing through a door takes a second. As stated, the door can be opened and closed, either on a hinge, or on a sliding mechanism, or even on a central axis. The motion of the door can be very interesting. Infrastructurally, the door and window can be combined, in fact, they are almost always combined.

    Window:
The physical proportions of the window vary drastically (cf photos). The only common characteristic that almost all windows have is that they are not a possible area of passage like the door. (In a specific case window, the window has the same width as the door (92[cm]), but the height is significantly less (79[cm])). Windows still do open up the individual to varied areas, but not for passage. Instead, the window aerates rooms, allows light to enter rooms, and allows the user to see the outside (in some cases not though). The time a window is used exceeds that of the door as aeration can last several hours, and a simple gaze can last minutes. Motion is the same as the door in most cases, though the window has more possibilities of motion. Infrastructurally, as previously stated, the window can be integrated into a door, or be integrated directly into the walls, ceilings in a way that they do not interact directly with other elements.


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    So what about combining elements that simply don't seem to be compatible?

We decided to make a bed with a canopy, the size of a bus stop (to integrate into one of the already made hybrids of Lausanne-Paris). This "bus stop" concept provides shelter from the elements, and the specialized window provides an unobstructed view of the sky. The window is very deep and the external hole is smaller than the internal hole. This is to focus the view in a single, small area. The creation of this new space creates the state of (day)dreaming.

Iterative design

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Scale model (1:20)


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Event: bus passing stop (bed)

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Construction detail (1:20 & 1:2) + Window detail (1:1)

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